A rare inside glimpse of the statewide AmeriCorps Program Director meeting taking place at Serve RI!  
These monthly meetings facilitated by the state commission is where so much great work happens.  There’s a lot of sharing ideas and stories of success.  It’s great to represent the Everyday Explorer team at these meetings each month.
-Rob

A rare inside glimpse of the statewide AmeriCorps Program Director meeting taking place at Serve RI!  

These monthly meetings facilitated by the state commission is where so much great work happens.  There’s a lot of sharing ideas and stories of success.  It’s great to represent the Everyday Explorer team at these meetings each month.

-Rob

Thanks to our 2012-2013 AmeriCorps Everyday Explorers for their year of service!  

Over the school year our team of 17 corps members brought hands on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math lessons to hundreds of middle school youth in Providence.  Here is a team photo from our final meeting of the year.  We took time for reflection, learning about the education award and even had a great pot luck.  Special thanks to Knight Memorial Library for hosting us twice each month!

For The Love Of Science: A Call To Action

Great NPR article on role of scientist mentors in schools

A fun project that our kids experimented with is making rock hard candy. The materials needed to complete this project include sugar, jars, a water boiler, thread, tape, extract (optional) and food coloring (optional). The children let the water heat up to the point where it is boiling and then water cools for 10 minutes. While the water is boiling they cut a piece of string that hangs from the top of the jar, but leaving 1 inch distance from the bottom. Then, attach the thread to a pencil or a chop stick by using tape or tying the thread around the pencil or chopstick. The kids soaked the thread with hot water and dipped it in sugar. The water allows the sugar to stick on to the thread. They placed their thread inside their jar. Next they added extract and/or food coloring to the boiled water and mixed well until it became syrupy. After the water was cooled for 10 minutes, they added the warm water to their jar and covered it with plastic wrap, (but not too tightly). Within a week, rock candy should slowly form. This is an educational and yummy experiment to do with kids.

A fun project that our kids experimented with is making rock hard candy. The materials needed to complete this project include sugar, jars, a water boiler, thread, tape, extract (optional) and food coloring (optional). The children let the water heat up to the point where it is boiling and then water cools for 10 minutes. While the water is boiling they cut a piece of string that hangs from the top of the jar, but leaving 1 inch distance from the bottom. Then, attach the thread to a pencil or a chop stick by using tape or tying the thread around the pencil or chopstick. The kids soaked the thread with hot water and dipped it in sugar. The water allows the sugar to stick on to the thread. They placed their thread inside their jar. Next they added extract and/or food coloring to the boiled water and mixed well until it became syrupy. After the water was cooled for 10 minutes, they added the warm water to their jar and covered it with plastic wrap, (but not too tightly). Within a week, rock candy should slowly form. This is an educational and yummy experiment to do with kids.

Science Fiction Storytellers at Nathan Bishop After Zone

Follow Jess’s (2nd year Everyday Explorer) blog from her program Science Fiction Storytellers @ Nathan Bishop Middle School.
Thanks for sharing Jess!!

The Spring Session of AfterZone is officially off and running at DelSesto Middle School! The combination of warm weather and cool icebreakers put the students and staff in a great mood last week that we hope to carry through this week and beyond. There are some truly awesome activities on the agenda so I have no doubt that good times are on the horizon…

Last week our focus was on getting to know each other and just having FUN! After reviewing student expectations and making sure everyone was on the same page insofar as building a safe, welcoming, and respectful community at DelSesto goes, our incomparable site coordinator Cam got the party started by leading a raucous game of “Gimme Gimme.” Here’s how it works:

Two equal groups of students are put on opposite sides of a large room and pitted against each other in a friendly, albeit potentially rowdy, competition. The game begins with a neutral and fair facilitator calling out loud “Gimme Gimme” followed by an item that at least one member of each of the teams is likely to have in their possession. For example, Cam’s favorite command to start off with is “Gimme Gimme a Jordan sneaker” because there is inevitably at least one pair of MJ’s signature kicks in any given crowd of middle schoolers at DelSesto (and a good chance that one or two kids will even have one pair on their feet and a backup pair in their backpack just in case the first pair gets scuffed). 

After the command is called out chaos ensues as each group scrambles to procure the item from whomever possesses it and quickly pass it to their team’s elected representative. That person must then either hold up the item or, if it is feasible and safe to do so, physically bring the item up to the facilitator, who should be standing equidistant from the two team reps. The first team to do so, assuming the offering passes the muster of the facilitator and/or any impartial judges they appoint, wins a point.

Now as the facilitator exhausts his or her repertoire of obvious items to call out for (i.e. an A+ assignment, a ring or necklace, a pair of glasses—be careful with this one lest somebody’s expensive prescription glasses be forcefully yanked off their face by an overzealous teammate—, etc.) they can and should get a bit more creative. In a particular stroke of genius Cam even came up with, “Gimme Gimme your entire team lined up in order of each member’s date of birth without talking.” Watching their faces go from pure confusion to silent determination as they used hand signals and non-verbal communication to organize themselves was priceless. And interestingly, for some odd reason out of over two dozen students nobody was born in January, February, or March. Weird huh?

Needless to say, the competition got extremely heated but in the end all of the students and staff alike had a blast. The energy in the room was tangible. This week we will try to translate that competitive spirit into a cooperative one that is just as buzzing but perhaps with a little less butting of heads. We’ve been busy preparing a slate of activities based on a different theme for each of the 4 remaining weeks of spring session (not counting the last week which will be more fun and games culminating in the big citywide End of the Year Event). And those themes are:

1. Entrepreneur Week
2. Self-Esteem Week
3. Hollywood Week
4. Fun in the Sun Week

Max here signing out, be sure to stay tuned for more from the team of Everyday Explorers at DelSesto. The lovely Jen is next up to bat!

The Everyday Explorers will be volunteering at the Olneyville Shines neighborhood clean-up on May 18th from 10:00am-1:00pm.  
Click here to sign up!

The Everyday Explorers will be volunteering at the Olneyville Shines neighborhood clean-up on May 18th from 10:00am-1:00pm.  

Click here to sign up!

One of our lessons at Gilbert Stuart involved a Cow heart !  We talked about how it was similar to a human heart . The youth were also able to touch , dissect and ask questions!

One of our lessons at Gilbert Stuart involved a Cow heart !  We talked about how it was similar to a human heart . The youth were also able to touch , dissect and ask questions!

Stuart Stem team

On the last day of our program ,the stem team at Gilbert Stuart decided to have the participants write down their favorite moments during the Winter session. Here’s what some of the participants said:

" I loved everything",

" What I liked about this program is when we made ice cream"

" I liked free chemistry" (during free chemistry we gave the youth lots of different supplies and let them  experiment)

" One of the projects I liked was when we had to be blind folded and had to try out the food and guess what it was".

" I liked the activity when we made ice ream and when we touched a cow heart". 

" I liked everything about being together,having fun,yelling,laughing,crying,but we were together and made memories" 

This session had its ups and downs but we loved it. Reading these statements made me realize that the kids  also loved it !!! 

Have you ever seen a volcano erupt? It is actually really impressive. If you want to learn and see how volcano erupts but can’t go to Hawaii, Australia or Argentina to see it, no need to worry! You can build your very own volcano using water bottles, flour, salt, food coloring, vinegar, baking soda and newspaper. According to our school kids, the best way to learn about volcanos is making it yourself. To learn all the different functions of the volcano can be very challenging. You can do so much with your own volcano. You can make the volcano the color you want whether it’s red, blue, green or even tie dye. Our kids made awesome volcanos and enjoyed shooting them off. How creative can you be?

Have you ever seen a volcano erupt? It is actually really impressive. If you want to learn and see how volcano erupts but can’t go to Hawaii, Australia or Argentina to see it, no need to worry! You can build your very own volcano using water bottles, flour, salt, food coloring, vinegar, baking soda and newspaper. According to our school kids, the best way to learn about volcanos is making it yourself. To learn all the different functions of the volcano can be very challenging. You can do so much with your own volcano. You can make the volcano the color you want whether it’s red, blue, green or even tie dye. Our kids made awesome volcanos and enjoyed shooting them off. How creative can you be?